Friday, 19 July 2013

A Tale Of Three Artists Part 3: Ptahmassu Nofra-U'aa

"The Father Ra" detail by Ptahmassu Nofra U'aa

I found Ptahmassu’s “Icons Of Kemet” website during one of my regular web crawls looking for Kemetic imagery and art. I was so overcome by his beautiful work “The Father Ra” that I knew that I had to contact him. Just to say “hello”. Just to introduce myself. To let him know that I saw his art. I only knew that I needed to connect.

What has transpired since then has been a wonderful interaction over the web that is anchored in Kemeticism but has grown to encompass a flourishing friendship.

Ptahmassu is High Priest of the Temple Of Ptah in Nevada and lives a life dedicated to Netjer. This is very evident when considering his work. As I have come to know him over the last few months I have learned that his understanding of Kemeticism is vast: not only has he read and researched and studied all manner of Egyptological tomes he has also studied comparative religions and is well placed for rich discussion in both spheres.

"Manu" uncompleted work by Ptahmassu Nofra U'aa; this is not only a divine work but a damn horny one too!

A recent interaction resulted in Ptahmassu writing this:

My feeling is that Kemet and Kemeticism are almost as much a frame of mind as they are a physical place. On the level of Spirit, Kemet is the Eternal embodiment of the Netjer, manifest in the sacred images, scents, gestures and words of the Ancients. Our task is to imbue these ancient treasures of the Netjer with a new life, to continue to pass these down to those who are starving for at-one-ment with the Netjeru.

Every day, we have the opportunity to engage in a thread of sacred creation that in its linear, outward manifestation is at least 4,000 years old, and I believe MUCH OLDER. The ancient texts, prayers and rites are not just flies stuck in amber on temple and tomb walls, but are the actual fabric of a technology of the Spirit through which humankind has direct access to Netjer. THAT is the true and Kemetic meaning of "religion". When we recite these prayers today, and partake of the offerings and ritual gestures of the Ancients, we and they are linked, and we enter immediately into the Presences of the Netjeru.

When we carve or paint or sculpt the Sacred forms and the Meduw (or hieroglyphs), we are "turning on" the gears of a most ancient technology of the Spirit, and permitting access directly to the Gods. We are partaking of "Sacred Time", and engaging in immortality. This, then, is our focus through our Kemetic art and practice. To be Kemetic means we LIVE KEMET here and now....It means we LIVE WITH THE NETJERU in each and every moment of each and every day.

Some of the works that Ptahmassu has allowed me to depict here are unfinished – because of the painstaking methods that he employs to create such wonderful icons and the precision that the gold leafing and precious stones require, it takes some time to execute.

"Auset - Great Of enchantments" unfinished work, detail; it would take too long to describe how this inspires me  . . . .   
Just as in ancient times in Kemet, Ptahmassu’s work can not be separated from the Divine Beings that it represents. Ptahmassu’s daily schedule includes traditional temple ritual – this I believe is reflected in the work that he produces.

Being able to connect with other artists depicting Netjer has been an incredible boost to my own process. In the case of Ptahmassu, our correspondences have been particularly inspiring: a work is developing as a result of my interactions with him that I presently can only contemplate – so much richness . . . how to execute?

Please visit his website so that you can own something created at the hands of this astonishing talent.


And so concludes my tale of three artists producing Kemetic works for our times. Writing these posts has been amongst my happiest blogging moments, and I hope that my readers have sensed this in the posts themselves.

"The Father Ra" by Ptahmassu Nofra U'aa; are there words to express the magnificence of this? It is almost too much to bear looking at!!!!

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